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Scholastic Alpha Grammar and Compostion Flyer.pdf

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Why is TM Grammar and Composition effective? 1. Complete coverage of grammar topics as determined by teachers at each grade level 2. Uses a systematic methodology to ensure learners grasp language concepts easily 3. Includes meaningful activities to engage learners and reinforce concepts learned 4. Builds language skills and confidence through comprehensive instruction, guidance and practice VOCABULARY BUILDING FORMATIVE AND SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT 5. Promotes holistic language development with integration of comprehension and vocabulary topics 6. Provides formative and summative assessment to assess learners' mastery of language skills 7. Detailed teaching notes help teachers plan and deliver lessons easily and effectively Exercises throughout each unit and periodic reviews allow teachers to assess learning outcomes. Detailed lesson notes help teachers prepare and deliver lessons easily and effectively. 79 © 2016 Scholastic Education International (S) Pte Ltd ISBN 978-93-5103-602-9 Review 2 1. Tick the correct adjective of quantity to complete each sentence. a. Is there water left in the flask? i. any ii. all iii. few b. Mira bought gifts for her friends. i. little ii. any iii. all c. Please do not put sugar in my coffee. i. some ii. a few iii. any d. buildings were damaged in the earthquake. i. several ii. much iii. any e. May I have sheets of paper? i. little iii. a few iii. few 2. Fill in each blank with the correct comparative or superlative form of the adjective given in the brackets. a. Are orchids ____________ than roses? (beautiful) b. This is the ____________ way I know to peel potatoes. (quick) c. Jim wrote the ____________ composition of all. (interesting) d. This is the ____________ part of the river. (shallow) e. Is there a ____________ bed than this one? (comfortable) f. Hazel has ____________ handwriting than I have. (neat) 3. Fill in the blanks with the simple present, the present continuous or the present perfect form of the verb given in the brackets. Example Lisa is crying because she has lost her doll. (lose) a. Dave ____________ his driving test, so he now drives everywhere. (pass) b. Mike wants a car, so he ____________ up to buy one. (save) c. I knitted my sister a sweater and she ____________ it today. (wear) d. Nocturnal animals are animals that ____________ at night. (hunt) e. Jane is coming to tea, so I ____________ already ____________ a cake. (make) Alpha Grammar G4_Review2.indd 79 26/06/15 11:22 AM 79 © 2016 Scholastic Education International (S) Pte Ltd ISBN 978-93-5103-602-9 Review 2 1. Tick the correct adjective of quantity to complete each sentence. a. Is there water left in the flask? i. any ii. all iii. few b. Mira bought gifts for her friends. i. little ii. any iii. all c. Please do not put sugar in my coffee. i. some ii. a few iii. any d. buildings were damaged in the earthquake. i. several ii. much iii. any e. May I have sheets of paper? i. little iii. a few iii. few 2. Fill in each blank with the correct comparative or superlative form of the adjective given in the brackets. a. Are orchids ____________ than roses? (beautiful) b. This is the ____________ way I know to peel potatoes. (quick) c. Jim wrote the ____________ composition of all. (interesting) d. This is the ____________ part of the river. (shallow) e. Is there a ____________ bed than this one? (comfortable) f. Hazel has ____________ handwriting than I have. (neat) 3. Fill in the blanks with the simple present, the present continuous or the present perfect form of the verb given in the brackets. Example Lisa is crying because she has lost her doll. (lose) a. Dave ____________ his driving test, so he now drives everywhere. (pass) b. Mike wants a car, so he ____________ up to buy one. (save) c. I knitted my sister a sweater and she ____________ it today. (wear) d. Nocturnal animals are animals that ____________ at night. (hunt) e. Jane is coming to tea, so I ____________ already ____________ a cake. (make) Alpha Grammar G4_Review2.indd 79 26/06/15 11:22 AM COMPREHENSIVE TEACHER'S MANUAL CONSISTENT PEDAGOGY 101 Each grammar unit has a consistent structure which makes the lesson easy to plan and deliver. 2 Naming Words 2.1 What are naming words? Let's Recall Capital letters are used for • the fi rst letter in a sentence. • the special names of people and places. Read the story. Her mother took her to the hospital. The horse jumped over a fence. The girl fell off and hurt her arm. What do you think happened at the hospital? A girl was riding her horse across a fi eld. assesses readiness for new learning provides scaffolded practice provides opportunities for collaborative learning 1. Look at the pictures. Write the names of the children in alphabetical order below. 1. Look at the pictures. Write the names of the children in alphabetical Review 1 offers continuous and comprehensive assessment provides an opportunity for error correction Word Power 93 © 2016 Scholastic Education International (S) Pte Ltd ISBN 978-93-5103-600-5 Silent letters Silent letters are letters that you can't hear when you say the word. 1. Unscramble the words with the help of the pictures given. Write them in the blanks and circle the silent letters. a. tubmh f. nkfie b. twrie g. bmco c. neke h. csalte d. geridb i. chtay e. 8 tghie j. falc 2. Make a sentence with each word below. Underline the silent letter in the word. a. wrist: b. two: c. climb: d. whistle: e. walk: Alpha Grammar_G2_Word Power_Final Proof.indd 93 23/06/15 11:24 AM 'Word Power' at the end of each book enhances learners' vocabulary for reading and writing. 1 Chapter 2: Naming Words © 2016 Scholastic Education International (S) Pte Ltd ISBN 000-00-0000-000-0 Chapter 2: Naming Words Chapter Overview 2.1: What are naming words? 2.2: Common names 2.3: Special names 2.4 One and more than one 2.5 Other forms of more than one 2.6 He and she words Note for Teachers In this chapter, students are introduced to the concept of naming words (nouns). They learn that names of persons, places, animals and things are called naming words. The illustrated panel story shows naming words in natural language. The questions that follow the panel story relate to the story and are designed to elicit naming words as answers to highlight the grammar point. As students work through the unit, they learn to identify and distinguish naming words from other words in a sentence. In subsequent units in the chapter, students also learn to distinguish between common and special names (common and proper nouns), one and more than one (singular and plural nouns) and he and she words (masculine and feminine nouns). 2.1 What Are Naming Words? Objective • Understand the concept of naming words Expected outcome: Children should be able to understand that everything around us needs to be identified with a naming word. Teaching Ideas After completing section 2.1 on pg 11 of the CB, use the additional activities given below to help students understand and learn the concept in a fun way. Individual work: Refer to the illustrated panel story on CB pg 11. Ask students to replace the highlighted naming words with a similar word to retell the story. For example: A boy was riding his pony across a park. The pony jumped over a puddle. The boy fell off and hurt his leg. His father took him to the doctor. Encourage students to make the story funny by using any naming word they can think of: e.g. A fly was riding a frog across a pond…Invite student volunteers to read their story to the class. Draw attention to the replaced words. Point out that each word names something. Summarise by saying that everything around us has a name. These names are called naming words. Pair work: Have students work in pairs. Have them ask their partner, "What's in your bag ?" Each student has to mention five items in their schoolbag. Point out once more that all things have a name. 1 Chapter 2: Naming Words © 2016 Scholastic Education International (S) Pte Ltd ISBN 000-00-0000-000-0 Chapter 2: Naming Words Chapter Overview 2.1: What are naming words? 2.2: Common names 2.3: Special names 2.4 One and more than one 2.5 Other forms of more than one 2.6 He and she words Note for Teachers In this chapter, students are introduced to the concept of naming words (nouns). They learn that names of persons, places, animals and things are called naming words. The illustrated panel story shows naming words in natural language. The questions that follow the panel story relate to the story and are designed to elicit naming words as answers to highlight the grammar point. As students work through the unit, they learn to identify and distinguish naming words from other words in a sentence. In subsequent units in the chapter, students also learn to distinguish between common and special names (common and proper nouns), one and more than one (singular and plural nouns) and he and she words (masculine and feminine nouns). 2.1 What Are Naming Words? Objective • Understand the concept of naming words Expected outcome: Children should be able to understand that everything around us needs to be identified with a naming word. Teaching Ideas After completing section 2.1 on pg 11 of the CB, use the additional activities given below to help students understand and learn the concept in a fun way. Individual work: Refer to the illustrated panel story on CB pg 11. Ask students to replace the highlighted naming words with a similar word to retell the story. For example: A boy was riding his pony across a park. The pony jumped over a puddle. The boy fell off and hurt his leg. His father took him to the doctor. Encourage students to make the story funny by using any naming word they can think of: e.g. A fly was riding a frog across a pond…Invite student volunteers to read their story to the class. Draw attention to the replaced words. Point out that each word names something. Summarise by saying that everything around us has a name. These names are called naming words. Pair work: Have students work in pairs. Have them ask their partner, "What's in your bag ?" Each student has to mention five items in their schoolbag. Point out once more that all things have a name. Lesson notes show teachers how to execute lessons for each page of the Coursebook

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